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Constraint Induced Language Therapy for Aphasia

Constraint Induced Language Therapy for Aphasia
Anastasia Raymer, Ph.D
May 26, 2011
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This is text-based course is a written transcript of the course, “Constraint Induced Language Therapy for Aphasia” presented by Anastasia Raymer on February 21, 2011.

This text is being provided in a rough draft format.  Communication Access Real-time Translation (CART) is provided in order to facilitate communication accessibility and may not be a totally verbatim record of the proceedings.

Click Here for Supplemental Handouts

>> Amy: Hi, everybody, let's get started.  Welcome to our e-learning expert seminar “Constraint Induced Language Therapy for Aphasia” at SpeechPathology.com.  Dr. Raymer received her B.S.Ed. from University of Wisconsin-Madison and her M.A. and Ph.D. in Speech Pathology from the University of Florida.  For the past 25 years, her research has examined the neural and cognitive mechanisms implicated in disorders of lexical and praxis processing, and the means to promote optimal rehabilitation of these disorders in individuals with stroke-induced aphasia, dysgraphia, and limb apraxia.  Her work is supported by the NIH (NIDCD) and the Department of Defense.  She has published more than 50 papers and chapters and has presented nationally and internationally.  She is a fellow of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association and former coordinator of ASHA Special Interest Division Two.  Welcome, Stacie, and thank you for sharing your expertise with us.

 (applause)

>> Stacie: This is going to be different to talk to you all through the computer, but hopefully this works out well and we’ll have a productive hour ahead of us.  We have been talking a lot about Constraint Induced Language Therapy for aphasia.  We really haven't done this particular type of treatment until just recently and we’re doing a study right now.  It has definitely changed my perspective on the treatment.  The way I led into this direction was because of some work I did as a volunteer with ASHA, with some of the ASHA staff, with Leora Cherney, and Janet Patterson, so I'll be referring to some of the work that we did together.  I need to acknowledge them up front because it was a team effort. 

Principles of Evidence Based Practice

As all of you know, these days what we do in medicine and in healthcare and in education is evidence based. Sackett (2000) says clinical decision-making is a 3-way mechanism involving the scientific evidence, clinical expertise and patient values (see below).  

Principles of EBP

I'm going to talk about the scientific evidence today, and also apply what we learned from the scientific evidence and developing our own clinical expertise. The third piece, that I think plays a part even moreso in the swallowing realm but also does at times in the communication realm, is patient values.  We have to consider what the patient's desire is when looking at clinical interventions, and that influences decisions that we make with a patient.  But the challenge is to remain abreast of the scientific evidence. 

Several years ago Rob Mullen at ASHA had done a survey and had queried clinicians about what their  obstacles were to using evidence based practice. Definitely, getting to the evidence and having time to consume the evidence is a challenge.


anastasia raymer

Anastasia Raymer, Ph.D

Dr. Anastasia Raymer is a Professor in the Department of Communication Disorders & Special Education at Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia. She received her B.S.Ed. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and her M.A. and Ph.D. in Speech Pathology from the University of Florida. For the past 25 years her research has examined the neural and cognitive mechanisms implicated in disorders of lexical and praxis processing, and means to promote optimal rehabilitation of these disorders in individuals with stroke-induced aphasia, dysgraphia, and limb apraxia. Her work is supported by the NIH (NIDCD) and the Dept of Defense. She has published more than 50 papers and chapters and has presented nationally and internationally. She is a Fellow of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association and is former Coordinator of ASHA Special Interest Division 2.



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