SpeechPathology.com Phone: 800-242-5183


Therapy Source Career Center - June 2019

Support Groups for Stuttering

Craig Coleman, M.A., CCC-SLP, BCS-FD

August 11, 2014

Share:

Question

Why is participating in a support group important for people who stutter?

Answer

Support groups are critical because they allow people who stutter to see that they are not alone.  It does not have to be a formal group; virtual groups are effective too.  Always try to build in some stuttering support group component for any child that you work with so they can meet other children who stutter.  It is critical to the process.  As an adult and clinician, you can talk to them all day about stuttering, but to see another child their age going through the same situations, to build peer relationships and to work on goals and techniques outside of therapy – those are invaluable tools.  The children find this to be true as well. 

It is important to note that treatment groups are not the same as support groups. A treatment group is when you several children are grouped together and they work on specific goals within that group.  For example, a child is working in “easy starts” in individual therapy so you add him to a group to see if he can do easy starts in group sessions as well.  You may go to the group session with him to see how he does in it.

A support group does not have any formal goals.  You do not charge for support groups and they should not be billed because there is no formal treatment goal to them.  The purpose of support groups is to get children around other children who stutter.  If they talk about stuttering, that is great.  If they do not, that is okay too.

Craig Coleman is an assistant professor at Marshall University and a Board Certified Specialist in Fluency Disorders. He is a co-founder of MC Speech Books, where he has co-authored two children's books on stuttering and is also the founder of the Virtual Stuttering Center, a provider of tele-therapy for people who stutter.  Craig collaborated on the child versions of the Overall Assessment of the Child's Experience of Stuttering (OASES), which assesses the affective and cognitive components of stuttering.

 


craig coleman

Craig Coleman, M.A., CCC-SLP, BCS-FD

Craig Coleman is an assistant professor at Marshall University and a Board Certified Specialist in Fluency Disorders. He has served two terms as president of the Pennsylvania Speech-Language-Hearing Association.  Craig is also a member of the Scientific and Professional Education Board of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association and Associate Coordinator of ASHA Special Interest Group 4: Fluency and Fluency Disorders. In 2011, Craig was awarded the Clinical Achievement Award of the Pennsylvania Speech-Language-Hearing Association.  Craig is a co-founder of MC Speech Books, where he has co-authored two children's books on stuttering.  Craig is also the founder of the Virtual Stuttering Center, a provider of tele-therapy for people who stutter.  Craig collaborated on the child versions of the Overall Assessment of the Child's Experience of Stuttering (OASES), which assesses the affective and cognitive components of stuttering.


Related Courses

The Ripple Effect of Stuttering: A Community-Based Approach
Presented by Craig Coleman, MA, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, ASHA Fellow, Mary Weidner, PhD, CCC-SLP
Video

Presenters

Craig Coleman, MA, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, ASHA FellowMary Weidner, PhD, CCC-SLP
Course: #9217Level: Intermediate2 Hours
  'I appreciated the presenters explaining what therapy/treatment looks like with preschool and school aged children and the rationale behind it'   Read Reviews
This is Part 2 of a four-part series. The stuttering experience has a ripple effect that extends far beyond the child who stutters. Parents, teachers, peers, and others must possess both knowledge and skills to best support children who stutter. This course will highlight new clinical tools and resources to provide a community-based treatment approach for stuttering. (Part 1 - Course 9278, Part 3 - Course 9301, Part 4 - Course 9304)

Best Practices for Stuttering Assessment and Treatment Including the Role of Support Groups
Presented by Katie Gore, MA, CCC-SLP, Craig Coleman, MA, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, ASHA Fellow
Video

Presenters

Katie Gore, MA, CCC-SLPCraig Coleman, MA, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, ASHA Fellow
Course: #9225Level: Intermediate2 Hours
  'This course opened up my eyes into the may different aspects of working with PWS'   Read Reviews
This course is Part 4 in a four-part series. It will provide an overview of stuttering peer support communities and the clinical importance of incorporating community experience into therapy. Current research and practical application questions will address goal writing, SLP roles and responsibilities, and common challenges connecting therapy to the community. Case studies will be shared to highlight assessment and treatment across various age ranges. (Part 1 - Course 9278, Part 2 - Course 9286, Part 3 - Course 9301)

Overview and Assessment of Stuttering: What Every SLP Should Know
Presented by Craig Coleman, MA, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, ASHA Fellow
Video

Presenter

Craig Coleman, MA, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, ASHA Fellow
Course: #9215Level: Intermediate2 Hours
  'liked the explanation of assessment tools'   Read Reviews
This is Part 1 of a four-part series. This course will cover current research and trends in stuttering. Specifically, information related to risk factors and epidemiology, as well as the foundational knowledge needed to assess and treat stuttering, will be addressed. Additionally, assessment of people who stutter will be described through the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) model, which focuses on all aspects of stuttering, beyond the surface-level characteristics. (Part 2 - Course 9286, Part 3 - Course 9301, Part 4 - Course 9304)

Treatment Approach Considerations for School-Aged Children with Speech Sound Disorders
Presented by Kathryn Cabbage, PhD, CCC-SLP
Video

Presenter

Kathryn Cabbage, PhD, CCC-SLP
Course: #9472Level: Intermediate1 Hour
  'The content was well explained'   Read Reviews
This course will address the theoretical underpinnings and research base related to differential diagnosis and treatment of articulation and phonological deficits in children with speech sound disorders. Special considerations for how to tailor evaluation and intervention to meet the needs of school-age children will be discussed.

Behavioral Frameworks for Dementia Management
Presented by Mary Beth Mason, PhD, CCC-SLP, Robert W. Serianni, MS, CCC-SLP, FNAP
Video

Presenters

Mary Beth Mason, PhD, CCC-SLPRobert W. Serianni, MS, CCC-SLP, FNAP
Course: #9473Level: Intermediate1 Hour
  '2 presenters that shared the load of communicating this information to us'   Read Reviews
This course will focus on cognitive-communication intervention strategies for various dementia presentations and will provide a review of evidence-based treatment. Behavioral frameworks along with their rationales will be introduced and applied across several dementia types and mild, moderate and severe levels of impairment.

Our site uses cookies to improve your experience. By using our site, you agree to our Privacy Policy.