SpeechPathology.com Phone: 800-242-5183

New master brand. Same great company. Introducing continued! Read Our Story

Signature Healthcare

AAC and Aphasia

AAC and Aphasia
Sarah Wallace, Ph.D.
April 10, 2012
Share:

 Communication Access Real‑time Translation (CART) is provided in order to facilitate communication accessibility and may not be a totally verbatim record of the proceedings.  Consumer should check with the moderator for any clarification of material.

This text-based course is a written transcript of the live event, "AAC and Aphasia," presented by Sarah Wallace on January 19, 2012.

>> Amy: I would like to welcome you to the SpeechPathology.com eSeminar titled AAC and Aphasia.  My name is Amy Natho and I will be the moderator for today's course.  At this time it is a pleasure and an honor to welcome back Dr. Sarah Wallace.  She's doing a second part of a presentation she did for us last year.  Sarah Wallace, Ph.D., is Assistant Professor in the Department of Speech‑Language Pathology at Duquesne University.  She teaches courses on aphasia, cognitive‑communication disorders and augmentative and alternative communication (AAC).  Her current interests include semantic treatments to improve word retrieval in people with aphasia as well as development of appropriate AAC strategies for people with aphasia and traumatic brain injury.  She has a particular interest in methods to support navigation of high technology AAC devices and generalization of the use of AAC strategies.  Welcome back, Sarah, we're glad to have you here and very excited to hear what you have to say. 

Outline

>> Sarah: Thanks, Amy for the welcome, and welcome to the rest of you.  What I plan to do today, along the lines of what Amy said, is to expand on a previous workshop I did related to AAC and Aphasia and to give you, the audience, some up‑to‑date ideas and strategies.  The review that I do today will be pretty minimal – I’ll try to throw out references and things like that along the way, but I will not cover the material I did last time.  Instead, I’m going to expand on that and give you some new ideas, so let's get started.  This is just a little outline of what we're going to cover today:

Outline:

  • What is AAC?
  • AAC Assessment Techniques (update)
  • AAC Strategies & Devices
  • Intervention Techniques
  • Wrap up

I did say the review would be very brief.  We’ll do that in the beginning and we’ll talk a little bit about what AAC is and why it would be appropriate for this population of people with aphasia.  Then I want to give an update on some assessment techniques related to AAC and aphasia, and that’s going to be a little portion of our time.  Then I’ll spend a good chunk of time talking about AAC strategies and devices, and this is really an update on some of those. I will not go over previously discussed strategies and devices in a lot of detail.  Then I want to talk about intervention techniques for helping people with aphasia learn how to use these great strategies and devices that we have available for them, and then I’ll do a quick wrap‑up. 

This page The rest of this article is not available, because you are not logged in to your SpeechPathology.com account.

Join Now to get the whole article and handouts.
This page The rest of this article is not available, because you are not logged in to your SpeechPathology.com account.

Join Now to get the whole article and handouts.
This page The rest of this article is not available, because you are not logged in to your SpeechPathology.com account.

Join Now to get the whole article and handouts.
This page The rest of this article is not available, because you are not logged in to your SpeechPathology.com account.

Join Now to get the whole article and handouts.
This page The rest of this article is not available, because you are not logged in to your SpeechPathology.com account.

Join Now to get the whole article and handouts.
This page The rest of this article is not available, because you are not logged in to your SpeechPathology.com account.

Join Now to get the whole article and handouts.
This page The rest of this article is not available, because you are not logged in to your SpeechPathology.com account.

Join Now to get the whole article and handouts.
This page The rest of this article is not available, because you are not logged in to your SpeechPathology.com account.

Join Now to get the whole article and handouts.
This page The rest of this article is not available, because you are not logged in to your SpeechPathology.com account.

Join Now to get the whole article and handouts.
This page The rest of this article is not available, because you are not logged in to your SpeechPathology.com account.

Join Now to get the whole article and handouts.

sarah wallace

Sarah Wallace, Ph.D.

Sarah E. Wallace, Ph.D., is an assistant professor in the Department of Speech-Language Pathology at Duquesne University. Her teaching and research interests include cognitive and language challenges of adults with acquired disorders and their use of AAC.



Related Courses

AAC and Aphasia: An Update on the Evidence
Presented by Sarah Wallace, PhD, CCC-SLP
Video
Course: #7602 1 Hour
This course will focus on advances in the last seven years related to implementation of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) strategies for people with aphasia. Although the review of foundational concepts will be provided, the majority of the course will focus on current evidence for designing interfaces, designing interventions, and expanding AAC use beyond supporting expressive communication. This course is open captioned.

Integrating Apps into Aphasia Therapy
Presented by Megan Sutton, MS, RSLP, CCC-SLP (C)
Video
Course: #7157 1 Hour
This course will address how clinicians can integrate apps and the iPad into aphasia therapy to support their interventions and their clients better. We will examine how to find, evaluate, and use apps with practical examples for therapy and life participation.

Pearson's EBP Briefs: Which AAC Interface Design Facilitates Communicative Interactions for Persons With Nonfluent Aphasia?
Presented by Kris L. Brock, PhD, CCC-SLP
Text
Course: #7937 1 Hour
Pearson's EBP Briefs are case-based courses designed to assist with everyday decision-making in clinical practice. This case will examine the clinical question, “Do persons with nonfluent aphasia demonstrate superior communicative effectiveness (e.g., more conversational turns) during augmentative/alternative communication (AAC) interventions utilizing grid displays (graphic symbols) than during AAC interventions utilizing scene displays (photographs)?” The related literature search and analysis, along with the resultant clinical decision and application to clinical practice, will also be discussed. A relevant assessment tool for this case is the WAB-R (Kertesz, 2006).

Medicare Muscle: Creating Defensible Documentation
Presented by Lorelei O'Hara, M.A., CCC-SLP
Video
Course: #6346 1 Hour
As claim scrutiny increases, it becomes critical that rehab professionals understand Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) requirements, and how to craft content that shows how our services met those requirements. This course will teach the requirements for services to be reimbursable by Medicare, as well as how to present SLP services through quality documentation.

Treatment to Improve Timing & Synchronization of Critical Neural Networks for Speech, Language, and Cognitive-Communicative Abilities; presented in partnership with Interactive Metronome
Presented by Amy Vega, MS, CCC-SLP
Video
Course: #6508 1 Hour
Synchronous timing of neural networks is critical for the core skills of attention, working memory, processing accuracy/speed, and executive functions that underlie speech, language and cognitive-communicative function in people of all ages. Researchers have identified that many of the individuals we see for SLP services exhibit impaired neural timing & synchronization, including those diagnosed with Dyslexia and other reading disorders, Autism, Sensory Processing Disorder, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Aphasia associated with stroke and acquired brain injury, cognitive-communicative impairments associated with acquired brain injury, and cognitive and motor planning/sequencing impairments seen in Parkinson’s disease. This course will introduce you to a patented, non-invasive biometric technology, called the Interactive Metronome, that is specifically designed to help you objectively evaluate and treat this underlying impairment in timing & rhythm in order to achieve better SLP treatment outcomes.