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TherapyTravelers - September 2018

Cranial Nerves Responsible for Taste

Tiffani Wallace, MA, CCC-SLP, BCS-S

February 9, 2015

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Question

What cranial nerves are responsible for taste?

Answer

CN VII, or the facial nerve, is responsible for taste in the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. CN IX (glossopharyngeal) and CN X (vagus) are responsible for taste in the posterior one-third of the tongue and into the pharynx.  If you think about swallowing a pill and it gets stuck in your vallecula you continue to taste the horrible bitter taste and it will not go away. That is because CN IX and X are still sending the sensory input of the taste.  We are able taste into the pharynx.

Tiffani L. Wallace has been an SLP for over 13 years.  She enjoys working with patients of all ages, however has a special interest in adults with head and neck cancer.   Tiffani is the co-author of the app Dysphagia2Go by SmartyEars.  Tiffani is the administrator and creator of several Facebook dysphagia groups and the author of Dysphagia Ramblings.


tiffani wallace

Tiffani Wallace, MA, CCC-SLP, BCS-S

Tiffani L. Wallace has been an SLP for over 13 years.  She holds her Board Certified Specialty in Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders.  Tiffani enjoys working with patients of all ages, however has a special interest in adults with head and neck cancer.   Tiffani is the co-author of the app Dysphagia2Go by SmartyEars.  Tiffani is the administrator and creator of several Facebook dysphagia groups and the author of Dysphagia Ramblings.


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