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Therapy Source Career Center - June 2019

Core Words versus Fringe Vocabulary

Kristi Murphy, M.A., CCC-SLP

March 9, 2015

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Question

What is the difference between core words and fringe vocabulary?

Answer

Core words are the main words that we use in terms of what we say.  Core vocabulary consists of those few hundred words that we use for 85% of our communication.  There are structure words such as pronouns, verbs, determiners, adverbs, adjectives, prepositions.  Almost none of them are nouns; even fewer are object nouns, and only the nouns with an obvious picture association.  

Extended (fringe) vocabulary is the extra words that we talk about.  Most of them are extended vocabulary words.  Most of the words are content or topic specific and are important. However, they are not used nearly as often as core vocabulary words.  

Kristi Murphy is currently works with children K-12 in specialized classrooms.  Her current student caseload consists primarily of students with multiple disabilities, orthopedic impairments, and autism.  A large portion of her caseload is non-verbal and requires some type of augmentative or alternative communication.


kristi murphy

Kristi Murphy, M.A., CCC-SLP

Kristi Murphy received her Bachelor of Science in Speech Pathology and Audiology at Miami University in Oxford, OH. She completed her Master of Arts in Speech-Language Pathology at the University of Akron. She is currently employed in Oak Hills Local School District and works with children K-12 in specialized classrooms.  Her current student caseload consists primarily of students with multiple disabilities, orthopedic impairments, and autism.  A large portion of her caseload is non-verbal and requires some type of augmentative or alternative communication.  Prior to that, she was employed at the Aaron W. Perlman Center at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, where she worked with adults and children with various disabilities using augmentative and alternative communication strategies and devices. She has taught the augmentative communication course at Miami University and was a support group facilitator for the local Cincinnati ALS support group for seven years.  


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