SpeechPathology.com Phone: 800-242-5183


Therapia Staffing Careers

Reducing Medical Errors

Michelle Tristani, MS, CCC-SLP

September 15, 2016

Share:

Question

What are some recommendations to reduce medical errors?

Answer

The Institute for Healthcare Improvement has provided recommendations to reduce medical errors and produce a safer medical system and culture.  They suggest that leadership is key; using top down methods for success. Communication is a big factor. Changing the organizational culture and making the “right choice” the easiest thing to do. Respecting human limits and recognizing the issues of stress, fatigue, workload, circadian rhythms, and limits to memory can also help to reduce errors. 

Recognize that multi-disciplinary teams and rounds, or meetings, related to specific patients who have a lot of diagnoses and co-morbidities, can be helpful. Those teams can help ensure that everyone is hearing the same thing at the same time. It is important to implement simple and clear systems and processes and train all staff involved.  Encourage the reporting of errors and encourage a learning environment to help prevent and reduce medical errors.

Other recommendations include:

  • Simplifying - by reducing hand-offs and steps in processes 
  • Standardizing - limiting any unneeded variety in drugs, equipment, supplies, rules, and/or procedures. When there are so many different types of equipment, it can become confusing.
  • Stratifying - avoiding the cookie-cutter mentality of a “one size fits all” approach
  • Improving communication - using standardized vocabulary and feedback. If the Mini-Mental Status Exam is an exam that has universal language, or the Montreal, (MOCA) or the Saint Louis; if one of those uses standard vocabulary that everybody understands, then let's not fix what is not broken, definitely.
  • Supporting time for team communication and collaboration, and encouraging information exchange. 

Michelle Tristani, M.S CCC-SLP, has provided speech pathology services for 24 years across adult and geriatric settings from acute care to skilled nursing to out-patient. Michelle specializes in progressive neurological diagnoses, specifically, Alzheimer’s and related dementias.  She has delivered a wide scope of trainings including, yet not limited to, cognitive disorders, dysphagia in persons with dementia, medical errors and ethics, management of the pulmonary, medically complex and palliative care patient populations. 


michelle tristani

Michelle Tristani, MS, CCC-SLP

Michelle Tristani, M.S CCC-SLP, has provided speech pathology services for 24 years across adult and geriatric settings from acute care to skilled nursing to out-patient. Michelle specializes in progressive neurological diagnoses, specifically, Alzheimer’s and related dementias.  She has delivered a wide scope of trainings including, yet not limited to, cognitive disorders, dysphagia in persons with dementia, medical errors and ethics, management of the pulmonary, medically complex and palliative care patient populations.  Michelle is currently a clinical specialist with Kindred Healthcare, is a speech-language pathologist at St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center in Boston, and is also an Alzheimer’s Association Helpline Counselor.


Related Courses

Behavioral Frameworks for Dementia Management
Presented by Mary Beth Mason, PhD, CCC-SLP, Robert W. Serianni, MS, CCC-SLP, FNAP
Video

Presenters

Mary Beth Mason, PhD, CCC-SLPRobert W. Serianni, MS, CCC-SLP, FNAP
Course: #9473Level: Intermediate1 Hour
  'Excellent course, clearly presented, highly practical'   Read Reviews
This course will focus on cognitive-communication intervention strategies for various dementia presentations and will provide a review of evidence-based treatment. Behavioral frameworks along with their rationales will be introduced and applied across several dementia types and mild, moderate and severe levels of impairment.

Assessment of Cognitive-Linguistic Skills: The SLP's Role in Acute Care
Presented by Lisa Mechler, MS, CCC-SLP
Video

Presenter

Lisa Mechler, MS, CCC-SLP
Course: #8194Level: Introductory1 Hour
  'Very practical suggestions were made for evaluation and treatment'   Read Reviews
This course will review the rationale for completing cognitive-linguistic evaluations with adults in the acute care setting. Informal and formal assessments will be reviewed, as well as the role of the SLP in a multidisciplinary team.

20Q: Clinical Challenges in Aphasia Rehabilitation
Presented by Janet Patterson, PhD, CCC-SLP, Patrick Coppens, PhD, CCC-SLP
Text

Presenters

Janet Patterson, PhD, CCC-SLPPatrick Coppens, PhD, CCC-SLP
Course: #8461Level: Intermediate1 Hour
  'lots of good information, organized well, fairly easy to read and follow along'   Read Reviews
The course highlights several clinical issues that are typically not addressed in aphasia texts but have the potential to influence the outcome of therapy. The authors provide concrete clinical recommendations.

Pharmacology and Swallowing
Presented by Angela Mansolillo, MA, CCC-SLP, BCS-S
Video

Presenter

Angela Mansolillo, MA, CCC-SLP, BCS-S
Course: #8464Level: Intermediate1.5 Hour
  'Wonderful and knowledgeable presenter!'   Read Reviews
Speech Language Pathologists are often asked to make recommendations for safe swallowing of medications for patients with dysphagia, but have limited information about pharmacodynamics. This course will provide clinicians with the information they need to understand and manage swallowing-related medication effects, identify potential impacts of food and thickener on medication effectiveness, and prevent medication errors in their clients with dysphagia.

Person-Centered Care 101 for Neurogenic Disorders
Presented by Sarah Baar, MA, CCC-SLP
Video

Presenter

Sarah Baar, MA, CCC-SLP
Course: #8475Level: Introductory1 Hour
  'Great ideas, organized presentation'   Read Reviews
Person-centered care is emphasized as a best practice in general health care as well as speech-language pathology. This course is an introduction for SLPs treating adults, to show how simple choices for each step of the clinical process can lead to a person-centered approach and highly meaningful, functional therapy.