SpeechPathology.com Phone: 800-242-5183


Therapia Staffing Careers

Post-Swallow Exhalation

February 10, 2021

Share:

Question

What is the function of the post-swallow exhalation?

 

Answer

What purpose does the post-swallow exhalation serve? It turns out there is more than one purpose. The obvious one is that it helps to facilitate airway clearance. Let’s say your swallow is not very efficient and there is some residue near your airway. If you inhale post-swallow, you will pull that material into your airway. But if you consistently exhale post-swallow you can push out any material that's trying to get into your airway.

The post-swallow exhalation helps to facilitate laryngeal closure and laryngeal elevation. It also helps to facilitate esophageal clearance, which is a pressure relationship.  I often say, "What happens in one part of the body affects what happens in other parts of the body.” This is particularly true for respiration and GI functions.  They are very closely linked. This relationship between esophageal clearance and post-swallow exhalation is a pressure relationship. As you inhale, your lungs are inflated and they put pressure on the esophagus. But as you're exhaling, post-swallow, that pressure is coming off of the esophagus. So, the esophagus can do its work in clearing the material that you just swallowed more efficiently. So, post-swallow exhalation serves multiple purposes.

Refer to the SpeechPathology.com course, Post-Extubation Dysphagia: Critical Information for Critical Patients, for more information on risk factors for and causes and consequences of post-extubation dysphagia, including options for assessment and management of these critically ill patients.


Related Courses

Dysphagia in Neurodegenerative Disease
Presented by Debra M. Suiter, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-S
Live WebinarThu, Jun 3, 2021 at 12:00 pm EDT
Thu, Jun 3, 2021 at 12:00 pm EDT

Presenter

Debra M. Suiter, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-S
Course: #9732Level: Intermediate1 Hour
Dysphagia is common in individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Parkinson’s disease. This course discusses the underlying pathophysiology and appropriate treatment programs for each disease, as well as use of alternate methods of nutrition/hydration.

Back to Basics: Swallow Screening: How, when, and who
Presented by Angela Mansolillo, MA, CCC-SLP, BCS-S
Video

Presenter

Angela Mansolillo, MA, CCC-SLP, BCS-S
Course: #8969Level: Introductory1 Hour
  'The information was well organized and progressed from one topic category to the next with clear transitions'   Read Reviews
Screening of swallow function is a well-regarded tool to identify individuals who are potentially at risk of dysphagia and in need of full swallow assessment, but the options are many and varied. This "back to basics" course will teach participants to make informed, evidence-based choices regarding appropriate screening tools specific to their particular patient populations and settings.

ALS: Medications and Oral Care
Presented by Denise Dougherty, MA, SLP
Video

Presenter

Denise Dougherty, MA, SLP
Course: #8717Level: Intermediate1 Hour
  'Organization'   Read Reviews
This is Part 1 of a three-part series on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). This course will identify medication and complementary alternative medicine that may be used by patients to treat ALS. The importance of saliva management and mouth care as a critical component of their daily care will be discussed, along with strategies. (Part 2: Course #8719, Part 3: #8720)

ALS: Advantages and Disadvantages of Exercise
Presented by Denise Dougherty, MA, SLP
Video

Presenter

Denise Dougherty, MA, SLP
Course: #8719Level: Intermediate1 Hour
  'EMST information'   Read Reviews
This is Part 2 of a three-part series on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). This course will discuss the pros and cons of exercise, including expiratory muscle strength training, for individuals with ALS. Research and the ALS.org's view on exercise will be presented, as well as information about the efficacy of exercise for this population. (Part 1: Course #8717, Part 3: Course #8720)

ALS: Impact on Nutrition
Presented by Denise Dougherty, MA, SLP
Video

Presenter

Denise Dougherty, MA, SLP
Course: #8720Level: Intermediate1 Hour
  'Very thorough!'   Read Reviews
This is Part 3 of a three-part series on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). This course will discuss nutrition options - including percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) - as well as strategies to use at mealtime. Culture and religion can influence acceptance of a feeding tube; therefore, a patient's decision should be documented in an Advanced Directive. Resources for the SLP and patient will be reviewed. (Part 1: Course #8717, Part 2: Course #8719)